FANDOM


Snail Trail
Other Names: Snailtrail
Inventor: Don Philip Green,
2001
Ranks: Eight by Eight
Sowing: Fractured
Region: USA

Snail Trail, also written Snailtrail, was invented by Don Philip Green (USA) in 2001. It has a "leave-a-trail" mechanism akin to the sowing in mancala games.

On January 23, 2008, variations of the game were implemented by Arty Sandler on igGameCenter, but not the original rules.

Rules

Snailtrail-1

Initial Position

The game is played on a rectangular board measuring 7 x 7 squares.

Each player has a snail, which initially occupies a corner opposite to the opponent's snail.

A snail moves to an adjacent square, diagonally or orthogonally like a king in the game of Chess. If a player must move several times at his turn, he can change the direction as he wants.

On his turn a player's snail leaves a trail behind, which is marked by tokens (e.g. Go stones). On the first turn of the first player, one square is crossed and marked, on the first turn of the second player two squares are crossed and marked, on the second turn of the first player three squares are crossed and marked and so on.

A player may not move to a square, which has already been visited and marked.

The player whose snail cannot complete a legal move loses.

An alternative description:

The game is played on a rectangular board measuring 8 x 8 squares.

Each square is originally occupied by a tomato. Each player has a snail, which initially occupies a corner opposite to the opponent's snail.

On his turn a player's snail eats a number of tomatoes in progressive order. That is, on the first turn of the first player the snail eats one tomato, on the first turn of the second player the snail eats two tomatoes, on the second turn of the first player the snail eats three potatoes and so on. A snail moves to an adjacent square, diagonally or orthogonally like a king in the game of Chess. If a player must move several times at his turn, he can change the direction as he wants.

The player whose snail cannot eat the number of tomatoes required to stay alive loses.

Variants

Bill Taylor and Arty Sandler suggested several variants. Some of the rule changes can also be combined into a new game.

Board Size and Shape

  • Snail Trail can be played on smaller or larger boards. igGamecenter uses a 11x11 board.
  • Arty Sandler also implemented the game for a rhombus board instead of a rectangular one.

Movement

  • Bill Taylor suggested that each player moves just one cell per turn.
  • The snails can only be moved vertically or horizontally but not diagonally.

External Links

Copyright

© Ralf Gering
Under the CC by-sa 2.5 license.

Ad blocker interference detected!


Wikia is a free-to-use site that makes money from advertising. We have a modified experience for viewers using ad blockers

Wikia is not accessible if you’ve made further modifications. Remove the custom ad blocker rule(s) and the page will load as expected.